PLA Course Subjects

Prior Learning Assessment Course Subjects

weather

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Courses 1-10 of 32 matches.
Pilot Weather Briefing   (ATC-341)   3.00 s.h.  
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Pre-duty bridfings; continual assessment/update of overall weather situation; preparation of pictorial charts of current/forecast weather; maintenance of weather displays; pre-flight briefings; operate all equipment are briefing duties; recred/report filing; classroom training re: National Aviation Weather System; astronomical producing system; aviation weather observation/forecasts; geography briefing area; local preparation weather displays: the weather briefing in proper format & sufficient detail to provide service users up to date real time weather conditions on the flight route. 
Weather Station Operation   (WET-221)   3.00 s.h.  
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Weather observer duties in a simulated weather station. Includes taking actual weather observations, operating station instruments and equipment, preparing weather products, maintaining publications, and implementing work center safety procedures. 
Central Weather Facility   (WET-322)   3.00 s.h.  
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Theories and techniques of weather forecasting in a simulated weather station environment, including typical forecasting and briefing duties. Operationally oriented simulated missions and forecast requirements to include analyzing weather maps, issuing spot forecasts, accomplishing flight clearances, and developing and presenting briefings. 
Aviation Weather   (AVF-203)   3.00 s.h.  
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Course Description
A study and analysis of mid-latitude meteorology in the Northern Hemisphere with an emphasis on those phenomena affecting aircraft operation.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Describe weather phenomena which impacts aviation and flight operations, including atmospheric composition and atmospheric circulation systems.
  • Demonstrate or explain how to conduct basic aviation weather forecasting.
  • Discuss aviation weather hazards such as wind shear, icing, severe weather, and other similar phenomena.
  • Explain how to read and interpret weather charts and maps, routine meteorological reports and forecasts (METARs, TAFs, PIREPs, SIGMETs, etc.).
  • Analyze and explain the impact of weather on aviation businesses.
  • Demonstrate how to gather, analyze, and use weather data during preparation for flight operations, including the impact of such information on decisions to fly or not fly.
  • Explain the following weather phenomena and their impacts on aviation operations: wind shear, mountain waves, volcanic eruptions, hurricanes, jet stream shifts, el nino and la nina.

 
Advanced Weather Station Operation   (WET-321)   3.00 s.h.  
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Requirements and procedures for acquisition/management of weather resources and programs, environmental support plans, certification of weather personnel, unit quality control programs, management information system input, and obtaining meteorological support from other weather agencies. Determination of concepts and procedures to support unique operations requirements. 
Weather Radar Operation   (WET-231)   3.00 s.h.  
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Principles and operation of weather radar systems with emphasis on interpretation of weather radar echoes. 
Operational Weather Forecasting   (WET-251)   3.00 s.h.  
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Subjective and objective forecasting techniques for flightpaths and terminals. Use of teletype and facsimile data plus current data from functional weather equipment and radar for analysis and forecasting exercises. Primary emphasis on developing forecasting techniques and identifying parameters associated with severe weather. 
Weather Observation   (EAS-235)   3.00 s.h.  
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Course Description
Practice in observing weather elements; making instrument evaluations; encoding/recording weather observations of sky conditions, cloud forms, atmospheric phenomena, visibility and obstructions, wind, temperature, humidity, pressure and precipitation; and classification of storm echoes received on storm detection equipment.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Demonstration of knowledge of standards instruments used to record weather conditions; how they work, their uses, and limitations or sources of error.
  • Be able to explain how visual observations are made ( e.g. Beaufort Scale), including sky conditions, cloud forms, other atmospheric phenomena (e.g. halos, sun dogs, smoke, etc.)
  • Understanding of the standard symbols utilized to record this data on weather maps.
  • Explain how storms are detected utilizing remote sensing (e.g. Doppler Radar, bow echoes, etc.) and how the patterns produced through such instruments are interpreted.

 
Plotting Weather Maps   (EAS-330)   3.00 s.h.  
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Course Description
Preparation of maps and charts from land, airways, and ship station reports; includes thermodynamic diagrams, constant pressure charts, aircraft meteorological reports, and local area surface charts.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of the fundamental elements of weather, the instruments used to gather this information and the scales on which such information are reported (e.g. temperature, humidity, dew point, wind direction and speed, cloud type and ceiling, types and amounts or precipitation, etc.)
  • Demonstrate an ability to utilize the Laws of Thermodynamics that apply to weather and climate to explain how changes in one element may produce changes in others. (e.g. The Ideal Gas Law; the relationship between temperature and pressure)
  • Apply dynamic principles to explain weather forming processes and conditions such as convention, stability, Wet and Dry Adiabatic Lapse rates, etc.
  • Construct of weather maps from raw data obtained from sources at land, sea and aloft, using the correct symbols
  • Construct Basic Thermodynamic Charts, using one of the more commonly utilized formats (e.g. Skew-t, Stuve, or Tephigram) and be able to explain how they are constructed, what they reveal about both present and potential weather, and why they are utilized.

 
Automated Weather Data Handling   (WET-241)   3.00 s.h.  
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Operation and management of automated weather data-handling system; includes man-machine interface, loop/sequences, composites, graphics editing, alerts, tables, plot models, command sequences, data types, and products. 
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