PLA Course Subjects

Prior Learning Assessment Course Subjects

recording

More *'s indicate a better match.

Courses 1-7 of 7 matches.
Intermediate Recording   (COM-242)   3.00 s.h.  
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Course Description
Fund raising for nonprofit organizations: corporate, individual and foundation giving. Grant writing.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Explain why nonprofits exist.
  • Define a philanthropic gift and discuss why people make philanthropic gifts.
  • Discuss the importance of an organization's mission in fundraising and the role of a “case for giving” in any fundraising effort.
  • Name, describe and give examples of at least five methods of fundraising from individuals and/or organizations.
  • Use the fundraising cycle to describe the activities possible to secure a charitable gift from an individual.
  • Outline the grant proposal process.
  • Describe the methods to identify a grant prospect and discuss the importance of mission match in this process.
  • Name how volunteers, board members and staff are used in a fundraising effort, and provide a job description of at least one volunteer role.
  • Talk about why commissions are not appropriate in fundraising.
  • Explain why the AFP (Association of Fundraising Professionals) Code of Ethics is an important guide to staff, board and volunteers who engage in charitable gift fundraising.
 
Advanced Recording   (COM-342)   3.00 s.h.  
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Course Description
Fund raising for nonprofit organizations: corporate, individual and foundation giving. Grant writing.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Explain why nonprofits exist.
  • Define a philanthropic gift and discuss why people make philanthropic gifts.
  • Discuss the importance of an organization's mission in fundraising and the role of a “case for giving” in any fundraising effort.
  • Name, describe and give examples of at least five methods of fundraising from individuals and/or organizations.
  • Use the fundraising cycle to describe the activities possible to secure a charitable gift from an individual.
  • Outline the grant proposal process.
  • Describe the methods to identify a grant prospect and discuss the importance of mission match in this process.
  • Name how volunteers, board members and staff are used in a fundraising effort, and provide a job description of at least one volunteer role.
  • Talk about why commissions are not appropriate in fundraising.
  • Explain why the AFP (Association of Fundraising Professionals) Code of Ethics is an important guide to staff, board and volunteers who engage in charitable gift fundraising.
 
Recording Techniques I   (MUS-285)   3.00 s.h.  
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Course Description
Fund raising for nonprofit organizations: corporate, individual and foundation giving. Grant writing.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Explain why nonprofits exist.
  • Define a philanthropic gift and discuss why people make philanthropic gifts.
  • Discuss the importance of an organization's mission in fundraising and the role of a “case for giving” in any fundraising effort.
  • Name, describe and give examples of at least five methods of fundraising from individuals and/or organizations.
  • Use the fundraising cycle to describe the activities possible to secure a charitable gift from an individual.
  • Outline the grant proposal process.
  • Describe the methods to identify a grant prospect and discuss the importance of mission match in this process.
  • Name how volunteers, board members and staff are used in a fundraising effort, and provide a job description of at least one volunteer role.
  • Talk about why commissions are not appropriate in fundraising.
  • Explain why the AFP (Association of Fundraising Professionals) Code of Ethics is an important guide to staff, board and volunteers who engage in charitable gift fundraising.
 
Recording Techniques II   (MUS-286)   3.00 s.h.  
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Course Description
Fund raising for nonprofit organizations: corporate, individual and foundation giving. Grant writing.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Explain why nonprofits exist.
  • Define a philanthropic gift and discuss why people make philanthropic gifts.
  • Discuss the importance of an organization's mission in fundraising and the role of a “case for giving” in any fundraising effort.
  • Name, describe and give examples of at least five methods of fundraising from individuals and/or organizations.
  • Use the fundraising cycle to describe the activities possible to secure a charitable gift from an individual.
  • Outline the grant proposal process.
  • Describe the methods to identify a grant prospect and discuss the importance of mission match in this process.
  • Name how volunteers, board members and staff are used in a fundraising effort, and provide a job description of at least one volunteer role.
  • Talk about why commissions are not appropriate in fundraising.
  • Explain why the AFP (Association of Fundraising Professionals) Code of Ethics is an important guide to staff, board and volunteers who engage in charitable gift fundraising.
 
Senior Piano I   (MUS-463)   3.00 s.h.  
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Course Description
Seventh semester of piano study. Includes repertoire from different styles, development of piano technique, and knowledge of performance practice applicable to the performed piano literature.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Describe your background, experiences, and study in applied piano (recitals, teachers, competitions, etc.) at this level. A list of repertoire studied from Baroque, Classical, Romantic and Impressionist/Contemporary composers is listed at end of chapter, with asterisks marking the pieces selected for this PLA. Required repertoire: four pieces from above historical categories, all from memory, and one technical study or etude from memory.
  • Identify five pieces representing at least four different styles, four from memory, and one etude or technical study from memory. (Ex: Baroque, Classical, Romantic, Impressionistic, Contemporary).
  • Discuss historical aspects of the pieces selected for this PLA (composer and how this piece relates to the composer's overall output, any relevant performance practices for this piece- ex. baroque ornamentation). A separate section in this chapter for each piece
  • Explain the form of the pieces selected for this PLA (sonata, rondo, ABA, fantasy, etc.). A separate section in this chapter for each piece.
  • Discuss memorization techniques and technical difficulties for each piece. A separate section in this chapter for each piece.
  • Provide links to a video recording of your performance of pieces selected for this PLA. The video recording can be a public performance or a private recording. The pieces recorded should total at least 20 minutes of music performed, should be appropriate for this level of performance, and should clearly demonstrate your understanding of piano at this level.
  • Submit recordings of selected repertoire performances in a private YouTube video of selected repertoire.
 
Senior Piano II   (MUS-464)   3.00 s.h.  
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Course Description
Eighth semester of piano study. Includes repertoire from different styles, development of piano technique, and knowledge of performance practice applicable to the performed piano literature.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Describe your background, experiences, and study in applied piano (recitals, teachers, competitions, etc.) at this level. A list of repertoire studied from Baroque, Classical, Romantic and Impressionist/Contemporary composers is listed at end of chapter, with asterisks marking the pieces selected. Required repertoire: four pieces from above historical categories, all from memory, and one technical study or etude from memory.
  • Identify five pieces representing at least four different styles, all from memory, and one etude or technical study from memory. (Ex: Baroque, Classical, Romantic, Impressionistic, Contemporary).
  • Discuss historical aspects of the pieces selected (composer and how this piece relates to the composer's overall output, any relevant performance practices for this piece- ex. baroque ornamentation). A separate section in this chapter for each piece
  • Explain the form of the pieces selected (sonata, rondo, ABA, fantasy, etc.). A separate section in this chapter for each piece.
  • Discuss memorization techniques and technical difficulties for each piece. A separate section in this chapter for each piece.
  • Provide links to a video recording of your performance of pieces selected for this PLA. The video recording can be a public performance or a private recording. The pieces recorded should total at least 20 minutes of music performed, should be appropriate for this level of performance, and should clearly demonstrate your understanding of piano at this level.
  • Submit recordings of selected repertoire performances in a private YouTube video of selected repertoire.
 
Acting I   (THA-120)   3.00 s.h.  
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Course Description
The student will be able to demonstrate how exercises, improvisations and fundamental scriptural analysis foster the actor's physical and emotional growth in realizing a character for the stage. The student will also be able to demonstrate basic knowledge of acting theories currently used by professional actors.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Use physical, vocal and emotional exercises to build strength, flexibility and spontaneity of characterization as evidenced in an audio-visual recording.
  • Examine an act from a modern realistic play through the application of text scoring and basic scriptural analysis.
  • Define the fundamental principles of acting methods commonly used by today's professional actors, such as Konstantin Stanislavsky, Uta Hagen and Mikhail Chekhov.
  • Describe a personal theory of acting as well as an overall approach to solving the acting problem.
 
Courses 1-7 of 7