PLA Course Subjects

Prior Learning Assessment Course Subjects

financial

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Courses 1-10 of 90 matches.
Financial Monetary History of the U.S.   (ECO-326)   3.00 s.h.  
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Development of financial institutions and money and capital markets. Central banking and the Federal Reserve System. Gold standard and floating exchange rates. Financial panics and economic crises. 
Financial Institutions and Markets   (FIN-331)   3.00 s.h.  
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Course Description
Financial Institutions and Markets examines financial institutions and systems as well as the relationship of U.S. capital markets to global markets. This involves the effects of interest rates and asset demand including stocks, bonds, options, and futures and their fundamental relationships within the financial market structure. The course analyzes the efficiency of financial markets and the role of central banks (especially the Federal Reserve System); in addition, the course examines the conduct of monetary policy to determine its effect on financial markets. Emphasis is given to the bond, stock, and money markets and their relationship to the management of financial institutions and financial regulations. The functions of the mutual fund industry, insurance companies, and pension funds are discussed and evaluated for risk and ethical considerations.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Analyze the functions of financial markets and financial instruments.
  • Discuss the role of interest rates and their usage in securities valuation.
  • Explain the effects of interest rate change and risk structure.
  • Characterize an efficient market.
  • Analyze the functions of various financial institutions in the economy, the financial industry, and for individual investors.
  • Distinguish among the roles of the Federal Reserve System and interpret the effects of monetary policy on financial markets.
  • Compare the functions of different investment vehicles, distinguishing between the bond, stock, mutual fund, mortgage, and foreign exchange markets.
  • Explain the connection between the ethical responsibility of the banking industry and the management of financial institutions.

Available by TECEP exam.  
Principles of Financial Accounting   (ACC-101)   3.00 s.h.  
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Course Description
Principles of Financial Accounting is designed to help you learn to record business transactions, summarize these transactions, and prepare, interpret, and use financial statements. The course begins with the accounting cycle, merchandising concerns, and financial assets and finishes with plant assets, liabilities, and stockholder's equity.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Explain the need for accounting.
  • Identify users of financial accounting information.
  • Interpret the components of a transaction and explain how the general journal and general ledger relate to the process of accounting.
  • Prepare, interpret, and use basic financial statements: the income statement, the statement of owner's equity, and the balance sheet.
  • Discuss and apply the steps in the accounting cycle.
  • Explain the accounting for inventories, plant assets, liabilities, and stockholder's equity.

Available by TECEP and CLEP exam. 
Fundamentals of Financial Planning   (BUS-291)   3.00 s.h.  
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Course Description
Course covers the financial planning process, regulation of financial planners, communication skills, the time value of money, monetary policy and business cycle, the business cycle, profits and the stock market, risk management principles, and life insurance, health, property and liability insurances, investment principles and equity investments, investment companies and fixed income securities, personal income tax planning, retirement, estate, estate transfer planning & case anal.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • To understand the role of the financial planner.
  • To relate financial planning to the realities of retirement.
  • To show knowledge of the financial planning process.
  • To show how to qualify a potential client and sign a formal contract.
  • To show understand the role of risk management planning including the various forms of life insurance, life insurance planning, health insurance, long term care insurance an disability insurance
  • To show an understanding of the basic tax structure as it relates to the elements of a financial plan
  • To show an understanding of basic elements of a financial plan including fixed income securities, mutual funds, bonds and tangible assets.
  • To show understanding of the concept of risk.
  • To understand the asset allocation model.

 
Financial Statements   (ACC-311)   3.00 s.h.  
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Ratio and analysis and interpretation of balance sheet and income statements data. Account classifications and income measurements; company ratios; trends and present position; development of industry standards; status of business indicators as guide for economic forecast. 
Business Case: Decision-Making and Financial Analysis   (FIN-452)   3.00 s.h.  
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Systematically identify decisions & critical issues in bus. cases; build a cash flow model, using the AT&T Investment Modeling Software (AIM) System; Correctly use discounted cash flow analysis, NPV, IRR, & MOI: Assess ranges of uncertainty on important variables; Conduct sensitivity analysis & present results. 
Principles of Credit and Collection   (BAN-164)   3.00 s.h.  
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Covers analysis of the role of credit in financial management, the four main responsibilities of the credit function, the use of financial statements, cash budgets and financial projections credit. 
Accounting for Non-Accounting Majors   (ACC-110)   3.00 s.h.  
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This course is intended to provide managers and potential managers an overview of the subject of accounting, teaching both financial and managerial concepts. The course concentrates on management accounting, opening with cost terms, cost behavior, relevant information, and cost systems. It then teaches the basics of the financial accounting cycle and the nature and purpose of financial statements and financial statement analysis techniques. The course concludes with coverage of budgets, capital budgeting, and responsibility accounting. 
Principles of Finance   (FIN-301)   3.00 s.h.  
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Course Description
Principles of Finance serves as an introduction to financial management. Financial management is concerned with value and, when applied to firms, studies financial decision making and its impact on the value of the firm. Virtually all management decisions have financial implications, and the impact of these decisions on the value of the firm is the basis by which management is judged. Superior management produces superior financial decisions that lead to growth and increased valuation of the firm. This course considers specific financial decisions such as selecting among alternative investments (i.e., capital budgeting), the sources of the firm's finances (i.e., the optimal capital structure), the management of current assets and liabilities (i.e., working capital), and the tools of financial analysis. The course emphasizes analytical tools and their use in solving financial problems.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Identify both short- and long-term financial management problems.
  • Solve optimal capital structure problems.
  • Analyze financial statements.
  • Determine a firm's cost of capital.
  • Use present value tables.

Available by DSST exam. 
Managerial Accounting I   (ACC-301)   3.00 s.h.  
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Course Description
An introduction to corporate accounting and to the concepts and techniques of managerial accounting. The analysis and use of information produced by financial accounting systems. Emphasis on the analysis of financial statements, methods of determining cost of manufactured goods and budgeting methods and concepts.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Discuss the utilization of financial statements from a managerial perspective including planning, analysis, and decision-making
  • Analyze financial information for use in decision making
  • Articulate the preparation, understanding, evaluation, and execution of financial and non-financial reports used in businesses
  • Demonstrate the utilization of costing tools
  • Discuss the conducting of Cost-Volume-Profit Analysis
  • Discuss and provide evidence of the ability to create and utilize budgets
  • Explain and provide evidence of the understanding of the time-value of money

 
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