PLA Course Subjects

Prior Learning Assessment Course Subjects

criminal justice

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Courses 1-10 of 34 matches.
Introduction to Law Enforcement   (AOJ-101)   3.00 s.h.  

Course Description
The following topics are covered: History and Heritage of Law Enforcement; Criminal Justice System in U.S.; Contemporary Police System in U.S.; Organization and Management of Police; Police Issues, and; Constitutional Law and Legal Precedents.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Explain the definition of crime utilizing the criminal theories, and concepts associated with the sources of crime data, the emerging patterns of criminal activity, costs of crime and the extent of the crime problem in America.Identify and describe the structure and functions of the main components of the criminal justice system: law enforcement, courts, corrections, and juvenile justice.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the history, development, structure and function of American police, courts, and corrections. Discuss the process of adjudication.
  • Critically analyze and discuss issues of crime and justice from varying perspectives including the roles of probation, parole, jails, and community corrections; as well as the functions of prisons and jails.
  • Recognize the importance of, and practice of, ethical behavior in a professional criminal justice work setting, both within the agency and within the community.
  • Exhibit strong and effective written and oral communication skills.
  • Identify and assess the general constitutional principles relevant to the administration of justice.
  • Critically consider, analyze, and research special issues in criminology and criminal justice and their effects on society.

 
Introduction to Criminal Justice   (AOJ-102)   3.00 s.h.  

Course Description
Introduction to Criminal Justice offers an overview of the entire criminal justice system. The focus is on the administration of police, court and correctional agencies, and the decision-making points from the initial investigation or arrest by police to the eventual release of the offender and his/her reentry into society. The emphasis is on the dynamic relationships between the various elements in the system as well as special problem areas.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Describe the major components of the criminal justice system.
  • Discuss the policies and practices of police, courts, and corrections organizations.
  • Explain how crime is defined and measured.
  • Define the various types of American law.
  • Identify the various critical issues facing the criminal justice system.

Available by DSST exam. 
Introduction to Administration of Justice   (AOJ-104)   3.00 s.h.  
The history and philosophy of criminal justice: overview of the criminal justice system identifying the various segments. The roles and interrelationships; overview of crimes, criminals and causal theories; jurisdiction of local, state, and federal criminal justice agencies; survey of professional career opportunities; ethics and professionalism. 
Communication in Criminal Justice   (AOJ-116)   3.00 s.h.  
COMMUNICATION IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE - Barriers to effective communication in the field of criminal justice. Development of effective intradepartmental & interdepartmental communications well as communication with the community & within the courtroom. 
Firearms Instructor Course   (AOJ-181)   3.00 s.h.  
Designed to ensure students acquire those skills necessary to become firearms instructors. Emphasis on instructor techniques and methodology, safety principles, firing range conduct, revolver and shotgun nomenclature, analysis and common shooter dysfunctions, and lesson plan construction. Successful students will receive certificates from the National Rifle Association and the Florida Criminal Justice Standards and Training Commission. 
Criminal Justice Problems in Business And Industry   (AOJ-236)   3.00 s.h.  

Course Description
Techniques and practices that assist private commercial establishments, particularly large industrial plants and department stores, in minimizing losses through security control. Issues that will be covered are physical security, procedural controls special problems such as business and industrial espionage, riots, shoplifting and dishonest employees.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Physical security measures are used to protect facilities against intrusion, espionage, and theft. Identify two (2) measures that could apply to any facility to address the following: (1) deterrence of potential intruders, (2) Distinguish between authorized from unauthorized people. (3) delay and prevent intrusion attempts, (4) detect intrusion and (5) trigger appropriate incident responses.
  • Most often business espionage is committed by employees who obtain a physical document or disks. Discuss security measures of computer access levels.
  • Successful shoplifting require privacy to conceal merchandise. Discuss the following security measures to prevent shoplifting. (1) Minimizing blind spots on the sales floor. (2) Fitting room security measures. (3) Camera Domes on ceilings, and (5) Electronic Article Surveillance (ESA)
  • Discuss the components of an effective Pre-employment screen process
  • Discuss how loss prevention/shrink audits ensure consistent compliance to company policies and procedures related to loss prevention and theft

 
Law and Evidence   (AOJ-243)   3.00 s.h.  

Course Description
A comprehensive analysis of the rules of evidence. Particular subjects include judicial notice, presumptions, the nature of real and circumstantial evidence, burden of proof, province of court and jury, documentary evidence, hearsay evidence, confessions, admissions, witnesses, and constitutionally protected evidence. Emphasis on evidence in criminal cases.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Evaluate the role of the various components of the criminal justice system and examine all the steps in the pretrial court process that can lead to the termination of a case into a trial, guilty plea, or dismissal.
  • Evaluate the role of the jury, judge, prosecution and defense attorney, and witness and analyze the sequence of events in a typical criminal trial.
  • Evaluate evidence in terms of it being relevant, material, competent, contradictory, or collaborative and analyze how judicial notice and presumptions can act as substitutes for evidence.
  • Assess the competency of children, mentally handicapped people, judges, and jurors as witnesses and evaluate how various relationships fulfill the requirements of the principles of privileged communications.
  • Distinguish the essential characteristics of a lay witness and an expert witness and describe the process for using a witness's recorded recollection as evidence.
  • Assess the exemptions and the exceptions to the rule of hearsay.
  • Distinguish between admissions and confessions and evaluate the requirements of and exceptions to the Miranda warnings.
  • Explain the exceptions to the law of exclusion and identify the conditions when a search and seizure can be considered reasonable.
  • Relate the types of identification procedures with the right to counsel and Due Process clauses and evaluate the reliability of the identification procedures with specific reference to the five factors set forth in the Biggers case.
  • Compare and contrast direct evidence and circumstantial evidence and analyze the circumstances under which prior bad acts, the character of the defendant, and the character of the witness is admissible as evidence.
  • Evaluate the conditions when secondary evidence may be introduced instead of primary evidence and explain the types of evidence that may be requested by the prosecution and defendant before and during the trial.
  • Distinguish among the various photographic and recorded evidence with reference to its admissibility in court and evaluate the three rules for their admissibility.
  • Evaluate how physical objects can be authenticated, introduced, and identified as evidence and assess the process of producing physical evidence in court with specific reference to its collection, marking, storage, preparation for use, and delivery.

 
Criminal Due Process   (AOJ-253)   3.00 s.h.  

Course Description
Due process is the essence of justice in the American Criminal Justice system. Students will be introduced to the significant constitutional cases which define due process of law in the justice system. Important cases will be read and analyzed. Historical trends in constitutional law will be reviewed. Students will be expected to complete the course with a fundamental understanding of the impact of due process issues on the operation of the American Criminal Justice System.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Analyze and consider constitutional issues and concepts as applied to criminal law.
  • Explore the multitude of 4th Amendment restraints on search and seizure and who these are applied to criminal procedure, from initial contact through prosecution.
  • Understand the 5th Amendment rights against self-incrimination and the procedures in place to protect them.
  • Identify issues of due process including legal representation and identification procedures
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the court system of the United States in terms of structure, constitutional issues and historical precedents.
  • Demonstrate an awareness of ethical issues in criminal justice, and how to use ethical reasoning to formulate decisions and promote organizational and professional trust.

 
New Jersey Criminal Code   (AOJ-256)   3.00 s.h.  

Course Description
Study of substantive criminal laws and judicial opinions with emphasis on the New Jersey Code of Criminal Justice to enhance insights into an understanding of the potentialities and limitations on the law as an instrument of social control.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Explain the four levels of criminal culpability.
  • Describe the standard of proof for proving criminal responsibility.
  • Identify the crime of murder and when its elements are complete.
  • Identify the crime of aggravated assault and when its elements are complete.
  • Identify the crime of robbery and when its elements are complete.
  • Identify the crime of burglary and when its elements are complete.
  • Identify the crime of bribery and when its elements are complete.
  • Identify the crime of possession of a controlled dangerous substance and when its elements are complete.

 
Alcoholism and the Criminal Justice System   (AOJ-283)   3.00 s.h.  
Alcoholism and the Criminal Justice System - This course will present an overview of the problems of alcohol abuse within the criminal justice field. It will highlight both the direct and indirect impact upon the areas of police, crime, and corrections. 
Courses 1-10 of 34   |  Next »