PLA Course Subjects

Prior Learning Assessment Course Subjects

crime

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Courses 1-10 of 36 matches.
Organized Crime   (SOC-359)   3.00 s.h.  
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Organized crime as a social phenomenon. The methods and goals of large-scale crime and its economic, political and social costs; popular attitudes towards organized crime; efforts of enforcement and investigation agencies to deal with the problem. 
Crime Prevention   (AOJ-383)   3.00 s.h.  
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Examines the fourth and most neglected "branch" of the criminal justice system – the community. It focuses on two major issues: citizen responses to crime and collective citizen efforts to control or prevent crime. Different types of crime prevention programs are examined with special emphasis placed on recent developments in the expanding field. 
White Collar Crime   (AOJ-303)   3.00 s.h.  
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Course Description
An investigation and analysis of white collar crime in American society. Based on the major classic and contemporary writings in this area of law violation, this course is designed to explore white collar crime in relation to the political economy, corporate and government organization, the legal system, and structural and cultural features of the workplace.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Explain the criminal and sociological history of white collar crime.
  • Identify basic characteristics and classifications of white collar crime, its causes, and what its consequences are for individuals and society at large.
  • Discuss the various aspects of corporate, a vocational and occupational White Collar Crime.
  • Define governmental White Collar Crime and discuss why it is difficult to obliterate.
  • Discuss political White Collar crime and how it differs from state crime or state organized crime.
  • Define and discuss enterprise crime, contrepreneurial crime, and techno crime as they relate to White Collar Crime.
  • Explain the main differences and similarities between civil and criminal law, and discuss the principal sources of lawmaking that pertain to White Collar Crime.
  • Discuss the role of state and federal law enforcement agencies and the federal regulatory agencies that deal with White Collar Crime.
  • Discuss how consciousness can be raised in society regarding White Collar Crime.
  • Evaluate, critique, and rank the relative usefulness of some hypotheses for explaining certain case studies and how lessons learned can be applied in a preventative and investigative perspective.

 
Organizing Against Crime   (AOJ-385)   3.00 s.h.  
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An analysis of community crime prevention and its relation to neighborhood structure and process. The course examines theories of community-based generation of crime; neighborhood structure and social control processes; and community crime prevention theory and efforts, with special emphasis on innovative approaches including neighborhood organization. 
History of Crime and Punishment in the United States   (AOJ-482)   3.00 s.h.  
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Ways in which Americans have defined crime, explained its causes, and punished and rehabilitated criminals. The relationships among crime, social values, and social structure. Areas of emphasis include colonial Massachusetts and Virginia; the creation of police forces and prisons during the first half of the nineteenth century; criminality during the Gilded Age and Progressive Period; Prohibition; creation of the FBI; crime and punishment around 1950-1970. 
Illegal Drugs and Crime in America   (AOJ-387)   3.00 s.h.  
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Students explore and analyze the relationship between illegal drugs and crime and all the relevant issues and ramifications. These include, but are not limited to: national and international trafficking, control of the problem, legalization, and explanations for drug use. 
Organized and Victimless Crime   (AOJ-483)   3.00 s.h.  
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This survey course reviews the sociological and philosophical aspects of victimless and organized crimes and the impact of the two on the criminal justice system. The concept of law and morality are discussed in regard to the "so-called" victimless or public order crimes. The nature and extent of organized crime as well as the determination of federal and state agencies to eradicate it are also discussed. 
Public Policy, Crime and Criminal Justice   (AOJ-484)   3.00 s.h.  
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Course Description
A review and analysis of intergovernmental relations involved in forming and implementing criminal justice policies, laws and procedures. The course emphasizes the development of quantitative and qualitative information used to analyze and formulate policy.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Assess public policy issues, processes, and resources as they relate to the area of criminal justice.
  • Interpret and critically analyze the research bases of knowledge in the field, and demonstrate how they are developed and used.
  • Integrate criminal justice theory with practical issues in the discipline.
  • Critically analyze the relationships between the public, law enforcement personnel, perpetrators of crime, and the criminal justice system.
  • Analyze criminal justice problems and propose solutions.

 
New Jersey Criminal Code   (AOJ-256)   3.00 s.h.  
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Course Description
Study of substantive criminal laws and judicial opinions with emphasis on the New Jersey Code of Criminal Justice to enhance insights into an understanding of the potentialities and limitations on the law as an instrument of social control.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Explain the four levels of criminal culpability.
  • Describe the standard of proof for proving criminal responsibility.
  • Identify the crime of murder and when its elements are complete.
  • Identify the crime of aggravated assault and when its elements are complete.
  • Identify the crime of robbery and when its elements are complete.
  • Identify the crime of burglary and when its elements are complete.
  • Identify the crime of bribery and when its elements are complete.
  • Identify the crime of possession of a controlled dangerous substance and when its elements are complete.

 
Victim Empathy   (PSY-431)   3.00 s.h.  
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Psychological study of the victims of crimes, the nature of the criminal justice system's response to crime victims, and the ethical and practical dimensions of crime victimization. 
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