PLA Course Subjects

Prior Learning Assessment Course Subjects

communications

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Courses 1-10 of 89 matches.
Communications and Society   (COM-303)   3.00 s.h.  
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Communications as a significant social force in the world. Channels, patterns of influence, controls, uses and misuses. Roles of technology. 
Data Communications   (CAP-305)   3.00 s.h.  
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Course Description
Intro. to the vocabulary and basic concepts of data communications. Networking, packet switching, satellites, and communication computers are examples of the technical subjects treated in some depth. Both the economics and political realities of international data traffic will be discussed so the student understands the problems of trans border data flow.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Explain the data transmission circuits, transmission media and the intervening equipment used for the data transfer between data terminal equipment.
  • Describe the communication channels including simplex, half-duplex and full-duplex.
  • Explain the ASCII character sets, parity and checksums, data encryption and data compression.
  • Describe the transfer of data in digital circuits.
  • Explain the network types, packet switching , and satellite communications.

 
History of Visual Communications   (ART-368)   3.00 s.h.  
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Historical survey of visual communications from ancient times to present, including illustration, book design, printing, graphic design, advertising, photography, film and electronic media. 
Managerial Communications   (MAN-373)   3.00 s.h.  
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Course Description
Managerial Communications is an upper-level undergraduate course that explores key theories and strategies of contemporary organizational communications. The course recognizes that challenges exist for creating and implementing effective communication both inside organizations (between individuals and groups) and outside organizations (with markets, partners, and influential third parties). The course is structured around four fundamental beliefs: Individuals within organizations will continue to experience change in their relationships with their own colleagues and with people in other organizations. Technology will have an increasingly significant impact on the content and methods of organizational communications, particularly at the managerial level. Managers' roles will continue to evolve away from dictatorial and authoritarian models to those emphasizing negotiation, coaching, collaboration, and consensus building. Managerial communicators will have to rely on situational analysis and planning in order to achieve ongoing effectiveness in communication.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Introduce key concepts of communication theory, strategy, and implementation within organizational settings
  • Develop students' skills in applying these concepts to realistic situations in a variety of workplace environments.
  • Explain the historical development of communication as an organizational process affecting internal processes and external relationships.
  • Define the steps in the process of human communication.
  • Compare interpersonal communication at individual and group levels.
  • Describe managerial communication as a component of organizational communication, and relate it to the roles and responsibilities of managers.
  • Identify the characteristics of technology that impact and interact with organizational and managerial communication.
  • Explain the key strategies for effective written and oral communication within and between organizations.

Available by TECEP exam.  
Research in Communications   (COM-492)   3.00 s.h.  
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Methods and techniques of research in communications: various types of research design, sampling, methods of data gathering, analysis and interpretation of research findings. 
Communications Ethics   (COM-460)   3.00 s.h.  
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Analyzes internal and external pressures on the communications professional including economic, cultural, social, and political pressures, assesses the philosophical and practical basis for responding to such pressures, evaluates contemporary media responses to these pressures, identifies those that are of laudable quality and why, and provides guidance as to how individuals and organizations can think and react ethically. Issues addressed include censorship, confidentiality, conflicts of interests, minority and ethic groups, privacy, sensationalism, and self-criticism. 
Introduction to Mass Communications II   (COM-121)   3.00 s.h.  
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Course Description
Introduction to Mass Communications II looks at how technological advances in electronic media have changed the way complex organizations produce public messages. The course examines changes in the broadcast industry brought about by the invention of television and changes in the commercial networks brought about by the expansion of service providers. The course looks at how various media professions shape mass media messages, and it evaluates the effects of industry regulation. Finally, the course assesses the impact of mass communications on the global village and examines the media's influence on the way people think and behave.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Identify major changes in mass communication produced by broadcast television.
  • Explain how the original television networks and movie studios controlled the production, programming, and distribution of public messages.
  • Analyze how the entrance of government into the broadcast industry changed the face of television.
  • Explain the role and the influence of advertising in mass media.
  • Investigate how public television changed corporate sponsorship, educational and cultural programming, and market share of the viewing audience in the late 1960s.
  • Explain the impact of Internet, cable, and satellite viewing on the networks.
  • Analyze the structures and features of how the Internet and the World Wide Web is evolving.
  • Define convergence and explain how the computer became a mass communication medium.
  • Summarize the rights and responsibilities of the media with regard to news gathering.
  • Discuss the entrance of CNN into the industry in 1980 and how its growth challenged broadcast network programming.
  • Evaluate how mass media influences communication internationally and across diverse cultures.

 
Introduction to Mass Communications I   (COM-120)   3.00 s.h.  
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Course Description
Introduction to Mass Communications I looks at the nature and history of how complex organizations produce public messages. The course examines the development of mass media after the invention of the printing press, the telegraph and telephone, and photography. It also examines the relationship between mass communication and culture as well as the historical and cultural significance and impact of the media. The course covers print media (newspapers, magazines, and books) and electronic media (radio, sound recordings, and motion pictures) and considers how the digital age is affecting each medium. Finally, the course looks at the economics of mass communications as well as social and ethical concerns that are currently prominent in the field.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Identify the elements of the communication process, communication settings, and the nature of the mass communicator.
  • Describe the various models for studying mass communication.
  • Discuss the historical and cultural context for studying mass communication.
  • Explain the impact of the development of printing, the telegraph, the telephone and the Internet on mass communication.
  • Describe the relationship between photography and motion pictures.
  • Describe journalism in early America, how newspapers became a major industry, the impact of the Great Depression on journalism, modern newspapers, and the impact of online newspapers.
  • Compare newspaper, magazine, and book production and publishing.
  • Describe magazines and books in early America, the organization of these industries, and their modernization.
  • Explain the evolution of radio as a mass medium, the economics of radio, radio production, and the pros and cons of Internet radio..
  • Assess the impact of the radio industry on the recording industry.
  • Identify recording industry milestones such as rock and roll, the commercialization of rock, and the British invasion.
  • Discuss the history of motion pictures, the organization of the film industry, and motion picture production.

 
Dynamics of One to One Communications   (COM-308)   3.00 s.h.  
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Course Description
This course is designed to examine the dynamics of one-to-one communication through reading and experientially: The course will further develop personal goals for optimizing personal communication and assist in establishing strategies for the attainment of these goals.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Describe the differences between--and implications of--the dynamic vs the static nature of one-on-one relationships
  • Recognize the variety of objectives of one-on-one communications and show an understanding of how the objective determines the flow of communication.
  • Identify challenges to achieving desired results in interpersonal communication.
  • Describe the role of nonverbal communication in advancing or thwarting effective communication.
  • Demonstrate ability to analyze effective and ineffective one-on-one communication--e.g., in a media interview, a job interview, a performance appraisal.
  • Recognize the role of good listening in achieving successful one-on-one communication; identify "good listening skills."
  • Describe the role of "rapport" in the one-on-one communication process

 
Modern Electronic Communications   (ELC-301)   3.00 s.h.  
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Course Description
A course in the operation of communication systems. Advanced topics in amplitude, frequency and pulse code modulation are presented. The applications of transmitters and receivers to audio, video and data communications are studied. Laboratory work concentrates on typical circuits, alignment procedures, and practical transmitter and receiver circuits.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Describe your understanding of the difference among amplitude, frequency and pulse code modulations.
  • Provide evidence of the implementation of amplitude modulation (AM) in your project(s).
  • Provide evidence of the implementation of frequency modulation (FM) in your project(s).
  • Provide evidence of the implementation of pulse-code modulation (PCM) in your project(s).
  • List the receivers that you have used in a project. Describe how you meet specifications and compromised on trade-offs in issues such as radio reception, decoding, DSP effects, amplifications, connections (Inputs/Outputs), trans-coding, etc.

 
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