PLA Course Subjects

Prior Learning Assessment Course Subjects

business

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Courses 1-10 of 57 matches.
Small Business Finance   (FIN-314)   3.00 s.h.  
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Course Description
This course explores the application of basic financial management techniques within a small business environment (100 or fewer employees). The course will consider financial problems and their solutions faced by persons who start and operate small businesses. Learners will explore the use and purpose of profit and loss statements, balance sheets, equity, debt, retained earnings and financial ratios; as they apply to common and alternatives solutions to the more common financial management problems encountered by small business.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Articulate and demonstrate advanced learning/knowledge/experience or accomplishments in the two following areas:
    • Preparation, comprehension and utilization of Balance Sheets, Income Statements and Source and Use Statements (pro forma and actual) - their preparation, comprehension and utilization for a 'best practices' in small business finances
    • Utilization and preparation of Cash Flow statements in managing the small business financial operations cycle
  • Articulate and demonstrate advanced learning/knowledge/experience in at least 4 of the following 9 areas:
    • Explain how to determine variable cost and fixed cost, understanding the difference between these types of cost and why that understanding is important for successful small business finance
    • Discuss the application of ratio analysis and how to use financial ratios for estimations of solvency, appropriate amounts of debt to equity, performance, and profitability
    • Discuss the application of management and the control of inventory [methods and practices] and why it is important
    • Discuss applications of the principles inherent with the management of accounts payable and accounts receivable and an understanding of their importance
    • Discuss source of and accessing investment funding for personal, family/friends, banks, and others - including crowd funding and other innovative methods
    • Discuss debt management including cost of debt, long term debt vs. short term debt - debt to finance short term needs vs. long term needs - pros and cons, and security/collateral.
    • Discuss compensation for yourself and employees, including income taxes/FICA responsibilities, benefits, salary/drawings and profit distribution.
    • Discuss taxes including corporate taxation/small business tax - tax planning/tax preparation
    • Discuss the preparation of a Financial Business Plan reflecting the annual financial cycle
  • Identify and discuss at least four common small business financial management problems, such as:
    • Transaction and payment authorization management
    • Equity financing
    • Depreciation accounting
    • Working capital financing/vendor credit
    • Managing accounts receivable
    • Cash-flow management
    • Financial/management and reporting (periodic, annual)
    • Insurance requirements/legal liabilities, and
    • Financial oversight
 
Human Relations in Business   (MAN-251)   3.00 s.h.  
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Course Description
Discusses the role of human resources in the workplace. Topics include motivation, ethics, organizational politics, listening skills, leadership & managing time.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Describe how Expectancy Theory provides insights into factors that influence motivation and then translate into job performance. Give examples.
  • Discuss how power and conflict can affect political decision-making in business organizations. Give examples.
  • Identify different behavior patterns of business leaders. Explain how those behaviors can result in different psychological reactions and work performances among their followers.
  • Explain how (with examples) an employee's personal value system can (a) conflict with an organization's value system and (b) affect that employee's work performance.
  • Discuss the growing trend of flexible-work arrangements. Include (a) factors driving the changes (b) examples of types of flexibility offered (c) benefits to employees (d) benefits to employers and (d) implications for managers.
  • Explain with examples what distinguishes a strategic leader from a tactical leader. Include the different skills required for each.
  • Identify common poor listening habits. Then present at least five ways to improve workplace listening. Finally, present specific approaches to use when listening to people speaking English who are not native to the United States.
 
Critical Issues in Nonprofit Management II   (MAN-482)   3.00 s.h.  
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Course Description
This course provides students and practitioners alike with the opportunity to investigate four major issues of concern to nonprofit organizations including 1) mission-based management, 2) social entrepreneurship, 3) volunteer management, and 4) strategic alliances.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Analyze the ethical, business and mission related issues surrounding social entrepreneurship.
  • Compare and contrast the social entrepreneur approach to the nonprofit and non-social business in achieving the aims of social entrepreneurs and their clients.
  • Explain and show examples of how "B-Corps" (benefit corporations) can be an advantage or disadvantage to social entrepreneurs.
  • Develop criteria for evaluating appropriate partners for effective strategic alliances between competing and complementary nonprofits.
  • Formulate an integrated service delivery approach with a program partner with complementary services within your geographic area of delivery.
  • Summarize the human resource, cultural, financial and other conditions necessary for mission based management.
  • Compare/contrast mission-based management with other management styles in nonprofits, government and business.
  • Compare/contrast volunteer management to the management of paid consultants (1099 workers) and traditional (W2) employees with a focus on the advantages/disadvantages, effective management styles, worker motivations in each type of employment.
  • Demonstrate through your own work, case studies and current literature.
 
Marketing: Business to Business   (MAR-304)   3.00 s.h.  
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Course Description
Fund raising for nonprofit organizations: corporate, individual and foundation giving. Grant writing.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Explain why nonprofits exist.
  • Define a philanthropic gift and discuss why people make philanthropic gifts.
  • Discuss the importance of an organization's mission in fundraising and the role of a “case for giving” in any fundraising effort.
  • Name, describe and give examples of at least five methods of fundraising from individuals and/or organizations.
  • Use the fundraising cycle to describe the activities possible to secure a charitable gift from an individual.
  • Outline the grant proposal process.
  • Describe the methods to identify a grant prospect and discuss the importance of mission match in this process.
  • Name how volunteers, board members and staff are used in a fundraising effort, and provide a job description of at least one volunteer role.
  • Talk about why commissions are not appropriate in fundraising.
  • Explain why the AFP (Association of Fundraising Professionals) Code of Ethics is an important guide to staff, board and volunteers who engage in charitable gift fundraising.
 
Directing for Film and TV   (COM-421)   3.00 s.h.  
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Course Description
This course offers an in-depth examination of the director's role. Explores the art, skill, authority, and responsibility of the director for preproduction planning, budgeting, casting, location scouting, and rehearsing in feature films, TV series, commercials, business and educational films, documentaries, news films, and videotape. Students work on assignments and exercises in scripts breakdown, shot determination, character description for casting call, sound stage utilization, camera placement, action blocking, and the preparation of a director's work script.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Discuss and demonstrate an in depth knowledge of director duties in pre-production, production and post-production
  • Analyze and breakdown a script, creating character breakdowns and shooting schedule
  • Create a budget for production and crew needs
  • Prepare and present a directors works script and shot list
  • Discuss the proper coverage of a scene, plan mise en scene, blocking and shot determination.
  • Discuss key factors in casting
  • Discuss key factors in location scouting
  • Identify key issues relevant to rehearsals
  • Articulate how these differ for feature films, TV series, commercials, business/educational films, documentaries, news, videotape
 
Business Law I    (LAW-201)   3.00 s.h.  
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Course Description
Fund raising for nonprofit organizations: corporate, individual and foundation giving. Grant writing.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Explain why nonprofits exist.
  • Define a philanthropic gift and discuss why people make philanthropic gifts.
  • Discuss the importance of an organization's mission in fundraising and the role of a “case for giving” in any fundraising effort.
  • Name, describe and give examples of at least five methods of fundraising from individuals and/or organizations.
  • Use the fundraising cycle to describe the activities possible to secure a charitable gift from an individual.
  • Outline the grant proposal process.
  • Describe the methods to identify a grant prospect and discuss the importance of mission match in this process.
  • Name how volunteers, board members and staff are used in a fundraising effort, and provide a job description of at least one volunteer role.
  • Talk about why commissions are not appropriate in fundraising.
  • Explain why the AFP (Association of Fundraising Professionals) Code of Ethics is an important guide to staff, board and volunteers who engage in charitable gift fundraising.
 
Business Law II   (LAW-202)   3.00 s.h.  
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Course Description
Fund raising for nonprofit organizations: corporate, individual and foundation giving. Grant writing.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Explain why nonprofits exist.
  • Define a philanthropic gift and discuss why people make philanthropic gifts.
  • Discuss the importance of an organization's mission in fundraising and the role of a “case for giving” in any fundraising effort.
  • Name, describe and give examples of at least five methods of fundraising from individuals and/or organizations.
  • Use the fundraising cycle to describe the activities possible to secure a charitable gift from an individual.
  • Outline the grant proposal process.
  • Describe the methods to identify a grant prospect and discuss the importance of mission match in this process.
  • Name how volunteers, board members and staff are used in a fundraising effort, and provide a job description of at least one volunteer role.
  • Talk about why commissions are not appropriate in fundraising.
  • Explain why the AFP (Association of Fundraising Professionals) Code of Ethics is an important guide to staff, board and volunteers who engage in charitable gift fundraising.
 
Business Law    (LES-114)   3.00 s.h.  
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Course Description
Fund raising for nonprofit organizations: corporate, individual and foundation giving. Grant writing.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Explain why nonprofits exist.
  • Define a philanthropic gift and discuss why people make philanthropic gifts.
  • Discuss the importance of an organization's mission in fundraising and the role of a “case for giving” in any fundraising effort.
  • Name, describe and give examples of at least five methods of fundraising from individuals and/or organizations.
  • Use the fundraising cycle to describe the activities possible to secure a charitable gift from an individual.
  • Outline the grant proposal process.
  • Describe the methods to identify a grant prospect and discuss the importance of mission match in this process.
  • Name how volunteers, board members and staff are used in a fundraising effort, and provide a job description of at least one volunteer role.
  • Talk about why commissions are not appropriate in fundraising.
  • Explain why the AFP (Association of Fundraising Professionals) Code of Ethics is an important guide to staff, board and volunteers who engage in charitable gift fundraising.
 
Introduction to Business   (BUS-101)   3.00 s.h.  
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Course Description
Fund raising for nonprofit organizations: corporate, individual and foundation giving. Grant writing.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Explain why nonprofits exist.
  • Define a philanthropic gift and discuss why people make philanthropic gifts.
  • Discuss the importance of an organization's mission in fundraising and the role of a “case for giving” in any fundraising effort.
  • Name, describe and give examples of at least five methods of fundraising from individuals and/or organizations.
  • Use the fundraising cycle to describe the activities possible to secure a charitable gift from an individual.
  • Outline the grant proposal process.
  • Describe the methods to identify a grant prospect and discuss the importance of mission match in this process.
  • Name how volunteers, board members and staff are used in a fundraising effort, and provide a job description of at least one volunteer role.
  • Talk about why commissions are not appropriate in fundraising.
  • Explain why the AFP (Association of Fundraising Professionals) Code of Ethics is an important guide to staff, board and volunteers who engage in charitable gift fundraising.
 
Business Mathematics   (BUS-161)   3.00 s.h.  
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Course Description
Fund raising for nonprofit organizations: corporate, individual and foundation giving. Grant writing.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Explain why nonprofits exist.
  • Define a philanthropic gift and discuss why people make philanthropic gifts.
  • Discuss the importance of an organization's mission in fundraising and the role of a “case for giving” in any fundraising effort.
  • Name, describe and give examples of at least five methods of fundraising from individuals and/or organizations.
  • Use the fundraising cycle to describe the activities possible to secure a charitable gift from an individual.
  • Outline the grant proposal process.
  • Describe the methods to identify a grant prospect and discuss the importance of mission match in this process.
  • Name how volunteers, board members and staff are used in a fundraising effort, and provide a job description of at least one volunteer role.
  • Talk about why commissions are not appropriate in fundraising.
  • Explain why the AFP (Association of Fundraising Professionals) Code of Ethics is an important guide to staff, board and volunteers who engage in charitable gift fundraising.
 
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