PLA Course Subjects

Prior Learning Assessment Course Subjects

biology

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Courses 1-10 of 32 matches.
Introductory Biology   (BIO-101)   3.00 s.h.  
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Designed for nonscience majors. Presents the essential body of knowledge about biology with an emphasis on molecular biology. Advisories: This course may not be used as the first semester of a two-semester sequence. It does not meet the Biology Area of Study General Biology requirement. For students taking BIO-101-OL, see the Bulletin for information about minimum system requirement. 
Radiation Biology   (RPT-271)   3.00 s.h.  
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Course Description
The field of clinical and basic medical sciences?that involves study of the activity of ionizing?radiation on living beings.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Describe principles of cellular biology and apply to principles of radiation biology.
  • Compare and contrast somatic and genetic effects of radiation.
  • Construct and evaluate charts, graphs and survival curves related to radiation biology principles.
  • Evaluate the relationship of radiation quality and dose to systemic(whole body) responses.
  • Describe radiation induced chemical reactions and analyze biologic damage.

 
Social Implications of Biology   (BIO-104)   3.00 s.h.  
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Consideration of the problems generated by the old and new discoveries in biology for man and society; biological factors of race and races and their social implications; the impact of overpopulation on man, society and environment. 
Biology I with Lab   (BIO-113)   4.00 s.h.  
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Major principles of biology as they relate to humans are emphasized. Human evolution, bodily organization, physiology, and relatedness to other life forms are highlighted in the human organism, populations, and ecosystems are stressed via focus on reproduction, genetics, behavior interspecies relations, and environmental quality. 
Biology II with Lab   (BIO-114)   4.00 s.h.  
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Major principles of biology as they relate to humans are emphasized. Human evolution, bodily organization, physiology, and relatedness to other life forms are highlighted in the human organism, populations, and ecosystems are stressed via focus on reproduction, genetics, behavior, interspecies relations, and environmental quality. 
Radiation Biology   (BIO-402)   3.00 s.h.  
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Course Description
General biological effects of the radiation spectrum. Selected topics: radio sensitivity, fallout, radioecology, applications of radiation to medicine, engineering, genetic, food, and technology. Provides an introduction radiation biology which is a field of clinical and basic medical sciences that involves the study of the action of ionizing radiation on living things. Ionizing radiation is generally harmful and potentially lethal to living things but can have health benefits in radiation therapy for the treatment of cancer and thyrotoxicosis.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Knowledge of the general biological effects of the radiation spectrum.
  • Selective topics: radioecology, applications of radiation to medicine, engineering, genetics, food, and technology.
  • Identify technology needed to provide adequate safety for handling radiative elements.
  • Discuss techniques to reduce worker risk from radiation exposure.
  • Describe the different types of ionizing radiation?
  • Explain what LD50 means?
  • Describe the basic principles are used in radiation therapy.
  • Summarize the 4 Rs of radiological biology.

 
General Biology II   (BIO-112)   3.00 s.h.  
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A continuation of the fundamental concepts, theoretical principles and practical aspects of modern biology with emphasis on animal diversity, genetics and ecology. Laboratory exercises continue to stress the development of skill in basic techniques, reinforce particular lecture topics, and introduce material not presented in lecture. Laboratory work includes human genetics, the isolation of DNA, and animal dissections. Available by CLEP exam.  
General Biology I   (BIO-111)   3.00 s.h.  
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A study of the fundamental concepts, theoretical principles, and practical aspects of modern biology with emphasis on cells, cellular processes, plants and plant processes. Laboratory exercises stress the development of skill in basic techniques, reinforce particular lecture topics, and introduce material not presented in lecture. Laboratory work includes measuring techniques, the microscope, cell structure and function, and plant anatomy. Available by CLEP exam. 
Molecular Biology   (BIO-404)   3.00 s.h.  
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Course Description
An in-depth study of the molecular basis of important biological processes of both prokaryotes and eukaryotes

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Articulate knowledge of cells, cell research, the chemistry of cells, and fundamentals of molecular biology.
  • Explain and demonstrate understanding of the flow of genetic information.
  • Explain and demonstrate knowledge of cell structure and function.
  • Explain and demonstrate knowledge of cell regulation.

 
Man's Best Friend: The Biology and Behavior of Dogs   (BIO-310)   3.00 s.h.  
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Course Description
Dogs and humans have been working and playing together for as long as 30,000 years. This course provides a comprehensive overview of the most critical components of a successful human-animal relationship, and requires students to synthesize what they learn about biology and behavior. This is accomplished by first examining the origin of the relationship between humans and dogs, and follows the development of the dog from the first stages of domestication through present day by including the dog's physiology, structure, reproduction and genetics. Next, developmental behavior of the dog is examined from birth to adulthood, as well as breed specific behaviors. Learning process and principles of training are also investigated through several common behavior problems and their solutions. Health, disease, and nutrition are also discussed.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Explain the role of genetics related to reproduction and breeding management, and the interaction of genetics and behavior.
  • Analyze anatomy and physiology.
  • Assess the coevolution of man and dog along with its relationship to domestication.
  • Describe developmental behavior.
  • Analyze learning processes and training principles, including: habituation and sensitization, classical conditioning, operant conditioning, and social learning.
  • Explain common behavioral problems and solutions.
  • Identify infectious diseases and common noninfectious disorders.
  • Discuss common nutrient requirements and nutritionally responsive disorders.

 
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