PLA Course Subjects

Prior Learning Assessment Course Subjects

acting

More *'s indicate a better match.

Courses 1-9 of 9 matches.
Acting I   (THA-120)   3.00 s.h.  
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Course Description
The student will be able to demonstrate how exercises, improvisations and fundamental scriptural analysis foster the actor's physical and emotional growth in realizing a character for the stage. The student will also be able to demonstrate basic knowledge of acting theories currently used by professional actors.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Use physical, vocal and emotional exercises to build strength, flexibility and spontaneity of characterization as evidenced in an audio-visual recording.
  • Examine an act from a modern realistic play through the application of text scoring and basic scriptural analysis.
  • Define the fundamental principles of acting methods commonly used by today's professional actors, such as Konstantin Stanislavsky, Uta Hagen and Mikhail Chekhov.
  • Describe a personal theory of acting as well as an overall approach to solving the acting problem.
 
Acting VI   (THA-321)   3.00 s.h.  
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Course Description
This course is designed to continue the study and development of the acting technique established in Acting I-V and to train actors to transfer these skills to the medium of television. Students will rehearse scenes taken from a wide variety of materials and commit them to videotape. They will learn how to make appropriate acting choices when playing in front of the camera and to deal with the problems faced by the actor in most TV/film production situations.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Justify adaptation of performance to the special needs of the camera
  • Apply scriptural analysis and text scoring beyond the introductory level by analyzing a scene or act from a play requiring the application of techniques and modifications for technical demands of TV/film.
  • Demonstrate understanding by submitting a video and scrip mark-up
  • Analyze the challenges facing an actor in articulating a character in front of the camera
  • Articulate a personal theory of acting above the fundamental level
 
Acting III   (THA-220)   3.00 s.h.  
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Course Description
Consolidation of the actor's technical development through work on scenes of moderately complex content and from various periods (e.g. Classic Greek/Roman, Elizabethan, Restoration or Commedia dell'Arte theatre). Use of self and the immediacy of time and place. Requires intensive outside preparation and of exercises and scenes for presentation in the studio.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Justify physical, vocal and emotional exercises in the building of strength, flexibility and spontaneity of characterization
  • Apply scriptural analysis and text scoring beyond the introductory level by analyzing a scene or act from a play from a different time period (e.g. Classic Greek/Roman, Elizabethan, Restoration or Commedia dell'Arte theatre)
  • Define the fundamental principles of acting methods commonly used by modern professional acting theorists such as Konstantin Stanislavsky, Sanford Meisner, Stella Adler, Uta Hagen, and Mikhail Chekhov
  • Using one character in a script, clearly demonstrate the application of theory to practice
  • Analyze the challenges facing an actor in articulating a character in various timer periods
  • Articulate a personal theory of acting above the fundamental level
 
Acting IV   (THA-221)   3.00 s.h.  
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Course Description
Extending the range of characterization by modifying and controlling physical and vocal characteristics, and by studying how clothing, manners and modes of other periods affect behavior. Exercises in animal and object controls and in using adjustments application in scenes. Use of International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA), and/or accent for characterization, and the use of physical development of characterization.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Justify physical, vocal and emotional exercises in the building of strength, flexibility and spontaneity of characterization.
  • Apply scriptural analysis and text scoring beyond the introductory level by analyzing a scene or act from a play requiring the application of accent use (translation of the scene to IPA) or physical manipulation to construct character
  • Define the fundamental principles of acting methods commonly used by modern professional acting theorists such as Konstantin Stanislavsky, Sanford Meisner, Stella Adler, Uta Hagen, and Mikhail Chekhov
  • Articulate the application of exercises in animal and object controls in development of character
  • Using one character in a script, clearly demonstrate the application of theory to practice
  • Analyze the challenges facing an actor in articulating a character in various time periods
  • Articulate a personal theory of acting above the fundamental level
 
Acting V   (THA-320)   3.00 s.h.  
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Course Description
Scenes from plays of various periods; studying the manners, mores and theatrical conventions of each selected period in order to create a heightened reality when approaching period scene work. This can be established by the extended development of characterization through a full-length production with multiple performance, or the representation of different characterizations with multiple scene work and character analysis.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Justify physical, vocal and emotional exercises in the building of strength, flexibility and spontaneity of characterization
  • Apply scriptural analysis and text scoring beyond the introductory level by analyzing the outcomes of integrating the application of the manners, mores and conventions within the production
  • Describe social, political and cultural events that have had effect on the various stages of theater's early development
  • Describe the evolution of the various parts of the theatrical process including architecture, performance and dramatic structure
  • Apply Aristotelian criteria to analysis of texts from each stage of theatre's early development and assess its influence on the development of the structure of plays
  • Develop communication abilities for performance through greater understanding and appreciate of the art of theatre HOW DO WE DO THIS?
  • Describe how theatre reflects the cultural values of society and how drama played a part in each age's enhancement of its culture's growth
  • Analyze and compare contemporary productions of theatrical texts from the Classical through the Elizabethan era with their original productions
  • Articulate the application of research in the manners, mores and theatrical conventions of a time period to a particular production or scene
  • Define the fundamental principles of acting methods commonly used by modern professional acting theorists such as Konstantin Stanislavsky, Uta Hagen and Mikhail Chekhov, and, using one character in a script, clearly demonstrate the application of theory to practice;
  • Articulate a personal theory of acting above the fundamental level
 
Acting VII   (THA-422)   3.00 s.h.  
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Course Description
The business side of acting; auditions, pictures and resumes, agents, and showcases. Students work on finding and preparing appropriate monologues for professional auditions.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Create a viable resume and headshot;
  • Research and choose a monologue depending on the medium (TV, stage, film)
  • Obtain and effectively work with an agent;
  • Understand and work within the union framework.
  • Present a short, mid, and long-term marketing program for the actor
 
Acting II   (THA-124)   3.00 s.h.  
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Course Description
Fund raising for nonprofit organizations: corporate, individual and foundation giving. Grant writing.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Explain why nonprofits exist.
  • Define a philanthropic gift and discuss why people make philanthropic gifts.
  • Discuss the importance of an organization's mission in fundraising and the role of a “case for giving” in any fundraising effort.
  • Name, describe and give examples of at least five methods of fundraising from individuals and/or organizations.
  • Use the fundraising cycle to describe the activities possible to secure a charitable gift from an individual.
  • Outline the grant proposal process.
  • Describe the methods to identify a grant prospect and discuss the importance of mission match in this process.
  • Name how volunteers, board members and staff are used in a fundraising effort, and provide a job description of at least one volunteer role.
  • Talk about why commissions are not appropriate in fundraising.
  • Explain why the AFP (Association of Fundraising Professionals) Code of Ethics is an important guide to staff, board and volunteers who engage in charitable gift fundraising.
 
Acting for Television   (THA-223)   3.00 s.h.  
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Course Description
Fund raising for nonprofit organizations: corporate, individual and foundation giving. Grant writing.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Explain why nonprofits exist.
  • Define a philanthropic gift and discuss why people make philanthropic gifts.
  • Discuss the importance of an organization's mission in fundraising and the role of a “case for giving” in any fundraising effort.
  • Name, describe and give examples of at least five methods of fundraising from individuals and/or organizations.
  • Use the fundraising cycle to describe the activities possible to secure a charitable gift from an individual.
  • Outline the grant proposal process.
  • Describe the methods to identify a grant prospect and discuss the importance of mission match in this process.
  • Name how volunteers, board members and staff are used in a fundraising effort, and provide a job description of at least one volunteer role.
  • Talk about why commissions are not appropriate in fundraising.
  • Explain why the AFP (Association of Fundraising Professionals) Code of Ethics is an important guide to staff, board and volunteers who engage in charitable gift fundraising.
 
Acting as a Business   (THA-224)   3.00 s.h.  
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Course Description
Fund raising for nonprofit organizations: corporate, individual and foundation giving. Grant writing.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Explain why nonprofits exist.
  • Define a philanthropic gift and discuss why people make philanthropic gifts.
  • Discuss the importance of an organization's mission in fundraising and the role of a “case for giving” in any fundraising effort.
  • Name, describe and give examples of at least five methods of fundraising from individuals and/or organizations.
  • Use the fundraising cycle to describe the activities possible to secure a charitable gift from an individual.
  • Outline the grant proposal process.
  • Describe the methods to identify a grant prospect and discuss the importance of mission match in this process.
  • Name how volunteers, board members and staff are used in a fundraising effort, and provide a job description of at least one volunteer role.
  • Talk about why commissions are not appropriate in fundraising.
  • Explain why the AFP (Association of Fundraising Professionals) Code of Ethics is an important guide to staff, board and volunteers who engage in charitable gift fundraising.
 
Courses 1-9 of 9